Cabbage Boobs, part II

by doodaddy on March 2, 2008

notBoobaby
Not my baby, just something I found on the Web. Kinda cute, though, don’t you think?

Hee, hee. I wanted to give as much guessing time on this one as possible, ’cause it was getting funny. First of all, thanks to all of you who were waiting to congratulate us on a pregnancy. It turns out that babies don’t actually come from under cabbage leaves, but I can understand why you were confused. You can also stop looking out the window for that stork…

Yes, we’ve weaned Boobaby, after 2 years and a month. (I so don’t want to put my foot in my mouth again about breastfeeding, so I’ll just say that 25 months worked for us.) Weaning cold turkey isn’t all that easy on one’s boobs (or so I’ve heard), and apparently everyone knows that a cabbage leaf or two on the ol’ booby will ease engorgement.

In fact, breastfeeding was working so well, I don’t know if we’d have had the cojones to stop at all. (OK, wrong metaphor, sorry.) However, having Working Mom pumped on morphine and Vicodin and god knows what else seemed like a good enough time to call an end to it.

The weaning was surprisingly easy — for the baby, that is. After one night with mom away at the hospital, Boo hardly asked for mamma-mo again.

And, of course, it’s a good thing we’re not pregnant (and we have been trying!), since it would have made surgery and recovery really difficult and potentially risky. Now that WM’s not nursing, though, maybe in a couple of months when we can try again… keep your fingers crossed!

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in goofiness,Working Mom ·

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

Rattling the Kettle March 2, 2008 at 4:43 pm

Wow. I’m surprised boobaby gave it up without a fight. Ronen is still going strong, at 30 months. E’s been out of town all weekend, and it’s not like he’s asking to nurse or anything, but I guarantee you that the first thing says when he sees his mom tomorrow is “can I nurse?”

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cake March 2, 2008 at 6:52 pm

could nursing be your passion? i am just giggling because there is a google ad up next to this post that asks “could nursing be your passion?” it seems really funny to me in this context, but maybe that’s the nyquil talking.
glad weaning went well, sometimes it does.
WM could be a hormonal mess for about a week though. i know i was.
take care.

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Avery March 2, 2008 at 9:11 pm

Hey, just catching up on all my reading. And, boy, did I miss a lot! Burritos give you appendicitis?! I had no clue.

I’m glad everything’s okay. I feel for your wife! My son never latched on, but I pumped for months, and weaning was a pain. Cabbage is good as long as you have plenty already cool in the fridge. And ice packs are great, too.

Wish her all my best! (And you, too. It ain’t easy being a weaning dad either.)

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Lis Garrett March 3, 2008 at 5:42 am

Could I please schedule a meeting between our children in which yours reassures mine that the world will not come to an end if she goes more than 24 hours without a boob? My toddler is now 32 months and is still a voracious nurser. She’ll actually say to me, “Just 2 minutes, please?” Yes, we now have time limits . . .

I’d just like my body back at some point.

Glad to hear your wife is recovering. :-)

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Jessica March 3, 2008 at 6:12 am

Hang in there guys. I remember thinking the pain was never going to stop. Guess what? It did but I still remember the misery clearly. Just think, pretty soon you will have your wife back. No sickness, no painful boobs. Hope you get some rest.

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Scott March 3, 2008 at 7:57 am

That is great that she was able to do it so easily. How is Mom taking it though…that she isnt needed for that anymore??? I would think that would be hard to accept. But then again…I am a man with no kids! LOL

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Jane Huber March 3, 2008 at 12:28 pm

Our weaning experience was remarkable similar. Jack had his “mamo” in the morning when he woke up and at night before he went to sleep. He was tapering off, so that some days he’d forget to ask in the morning. Then, at 20 months, I got a staph infection and had to go on strong antibiotics (we tried the light stuff, but it didn’t work). So, cold turkey on nursing. Jack asked about it a few times, and we always told him “mamo has gone away.” He never cried about it or even seemed upset. Just very matter of fact. I think it was harder on me than him! We still talk about it now (he’s now 26 months) sometimes, how the two of us had a special time together when he had mamo, and he smiles about it.

Speaking of weaning, we’ve been mildly working on getting him to give up his nap/bed time binky for a while. Yesterday, when he asked for it at naptime, I found it had a hole and told him why I had to throw it away. Then the other binky had a hole as well, so that went into the trash. I told him we didn’t have any more binkys (truth). Now, one full day later, he has asked for it a total of 2 times, and we have told him we don’t have any more. And just like with the end of nursing, he seems fine about it!

If only potty training was so easy….

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Aimee Greeblemonkey March 3, 2008 at 5:00 pm

Congrats to both ladies! and that picture cracked me up too!

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doodaddy March 3, 2008 at 5:58 pm

It has been a little hard on mom, yeah — someone told me to expect an emotional week, and I think the whole week came yesterday.

To be expected. Hormones suck.

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Ophelia Rising March 4, 2008 at 7:01 am

WHAT?! Babies do NOT come from cabbage patches? Next you’re going to tell me that people create children by having sex, or something. Jeesh.

Seriously, though, I am still nursing Liv before bedtime and napping, with no end in sight. I don’t mind it most of the time, but often I wish I could just have my body back again. At the same time, I know that I’ll miss it sorely when she’s done. Such is the dilemna of a parent – and a child, for that matter. The letting-go versus the holding-on. I think this is the perpetual dichotomy of our days as parents.

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